Sustaining the Work

Tier Two Survey

The tier two survey process was designed for representatives of nominated projects, programs, and organizations to share information about their work, who they serve, and how they sustain their efforts. Overwhelmingly, nominees rely on grant funds from federal and private sources, with only 15% of nominees reporting they are self-sustaining.

 

 

Overwhelmingly, the nominees reported that their projects, programs, and organizations seek external support to sustain their work, largely in the form of grants and donations. Nominees seek support for their work from multiple types of entities, including tribal, federal, and foundations. Of those sources, most nominees reported that they sustain their work with federal grant funds, with grants from private national and community-based organizations also making up a significant portion of their budgets.

Around 30% of nominees reported that they have also received donations from their tribes in addition to grant funds from federal and foundation sources. The least common funding source was self-sustained revenue, which was not surprising considering that most nominees are organized as non-profit entities under tribal and/or federal tax law.

Other funding sources indicated in responses included federal cooperative agreements and grants from Tribal Nations.

 

Sustaining the Work

Tier Two Survey

The majority of nominees reported that they frequently work with trusted Native partners to help accomplish their mission. These partners serve as researchers, evaluators, subject matter/content experts, consultants, and more.

 

 

Of the 59% of nominees who reported that they have Native partners that they work with, the majority of those nominees further reported that the most common type of partnership they have with these trusted individuals is in the role of an evaluator for their work. About 33% of respondents indicated that this was the role their trusted partner took within their work. Just under 30% reported that their trusted partners primarily function in a consultant's role. This category is very broad and covers a lot of ground; there is likely some overlap between this category and the evaluator's role.

Less common were partners serving as researchers and content or subject matter experts. Approximately 14% of the nominees reported that they use trusted partners as researchers, with a further 14% using trusted partners as content experts.

Overall, the data indicate that trusted partners are an important part of delivering this work across Indian Country for most of the nominees.

Sustaining the Work

Tier Two Survey

 

The tier two survey process was designed for representatives of nominated projects, programs, and organizations to share information about their work, who they serve, and how they sustain their efforts. Overwhelmingly, nominees rely on grant funds from federal and private sources, with only 15% of nominees reporting they are self-sustaining.

 

 

Overwhelmingly, the nominees reported that their projects, programs, and organizations seek external support to sustain their work, largely in the form of grants and donations. Nominees seek support for their work from multiple types of entities, including tribal, federal, and foundations. Of those sources, most nominees reported that they sustain their work with federal grant funds, with grants from private national and community-based organizations also making up a significant portion of their budgets.

 

Around 30% of nominees reported that they have also received donations from their tribes in addition to grant funds from federal and foundation sources. The least common funding source was self-sustained revenue, which was not surprising considering that most nominees are organized as non-profit entities under tribal and/or federal tax law.

 

Other funding sources indicated in responses included federal cooperative agreements and grants from Tribal Nations.

 

 

Sustaining the Work

Tier Two Survey

 

The majority of nominees reported that they frequently work with trusted Native partners to help accomplish their mission. These partners serve as researchers, evaluators, subject matter/content experts, consultants, and more.

 

 

 

 

Of the 59% of nominees who reported that they have Native partners that they work with, the majority of those nominees further reported that the most common type of partnership they have with these trusted individuals is in the role of an evaluator for their work. About 33% of respondents indicated that this was the role their trusted partner took within their work. Just under 30% reported that their trusted partners primarily function in a consultant's role. This category is very broad and covers a lot of ground; there is likely some overlap between this category and the evaluator's role.

 

Less common were partners serving as researchers and content or subject matter experts. Approximately 14% of the nominees reported that they use trusted partners as researchers, with a further 14% using trusted partners as content experts.

 

Overall, the data indicate that trusted partners are an important part of delivering this work across Indian Country for most of the nominees.